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Anemia

Lead poisoning

Hypercholesterolemia

Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

Hypertension

Sports Injury

Childhood Injuries

Preventive Medicine

David Johnson, M.D.

A nine month old child has very pale mucous membranes.

Anemia

Timing of "screening" is controversial.

Peripheral hematocrit may be lower than central venous hematocrit

Lead Poisoning

Sources of Lead

Young children are at risk thru hand-mouth exposure and thru respiratory tract

Testing

Hypercholesterolemia

Childhood symptoms of hyperlipidemia are very rare but may include xanthomas, corneal arcus, heart disease, and hypertension.

Family history will identify 40-60% of children with hypercholesterolemia.

Total cholesterol = LDL-cholesterol + HDL-cholesterol + Triglycerides/5

Secondary causes of high total cholesterol include endocrine, renal and hepatic disorders, and drugs.

Screening is recommended after age "Physiologic anemia" occurs 2-3 months for patients with a family history of hypercholesterolemia. A fasting level is preferred.

A two week old anemia, lead poisoning, hypercholesterolemia, developmental dysplasia of the Hip, hip dysplasia, hypertension, sports injury, injuries, preventive medicine presents with a unilateral "hip click".

Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

The presentation can vary from mild instability to true dislocation.

Incidence: Dislocatable hip = 1:100

Frank dislocation = 1:1000

Clinical Examination